SDLC

Software Development

Software development is the process of computer programming, documenting, testing, and bug fixing involved in creating and maintaining applications and frameworks resulting in a software product. Software development is a process of writing and maintaining the source code, but in a broader sense, it includes all that is involved between the conception of the desired software through to the final manifestation of the software, sometimes in a planned and structured process. Therefore, software development may include research, new development, prototyping, modification, reuse, re-engineering, maintenance, or any other activities that result in software products.

Software Development Life Cycle

Software Development Life Cycle (SDLC) is a process used by the software industry to design, develop and test high quality softwares. The SDLC aims to produce a high-quality software that meets or exceeds customer expectations, reaches completion within times and cost estimates.

  • SDLC is the acronym of Software Development Life Cycle
  • It is also called as Software Development Process.
  • SDLC is a framework defining tasks performed at each step in the software development process
  • ISO/IEC 12207 is an international standard for software life-cycle processes. It aims to be the standard that defines all the tasks required for developing and maintaining software.

What is SDLC?

SDLC is a process followed for a software project, within a software organization. It consists of a detailed plan describing how to develop, maintain, replace and alter or enhance specific software. The life cycle defines a methodology for improving the quality of software and the overall development process.

The following figure is a graphical representation of the various stages of a typical SDLC.

Types of Software developing life cycles (SDLC)

  • Waterfalls Model
  • V-Shaped Model
  • Evolutionary Prototyping Model
  • Spiral Method (SDM)
  • Iterative and Incremental Method
  • Agile Development

Waterfalls Model

The waterfall Model is a linear sequential flow. In which progress is seen as flowing steadily downwards (like a waterfall) through the phases of software implementation. This means that any phase in the development process begins only if the previous phase is complete. The waterfall approach does not define the process to go back to the previous phase to handle changes in requirement. The waterfall approach is the earliest approach and most widely known that was used for software development.

V-Shaped Model

It is an extension of the waterfall model, Instead of moving down in a linear way, the process steps are bent upwards after the implementation and coding phase, to form the typical V shape. The major difference between V-shaped model and waterfall model is the early test planning in the V-shaped model.

Prototyping Model

It refers to the activity of creating prototypes of software applications, for example, incomplete versions of the software program being developed. It is an activity that can occur in software development. It used to visualize some component of the software to limit the gap of misunderstanding the customer requirements by the development team. This also will reduce the iterations may occur in waterfall approach and hard to be implemented due to the inflexibility of the waterfall approach. So, when the final prototype is developed, the requirement is considered to be frozen.

Spiral Model (SDM)

It is combining elements of both design and prototyping-in-stages, in an effort to combine advantages of top-down and bottom-up concepts. This model of development combines the features of the prototyping model and the waterfall model. The spiral model is favored for large, expensive, and complicated projects. This model uses many of the same phases as the waterfall model, in essentially the same order, separated by planning, risk assessment, and the building of prototypes and simulations.

Iterative and Incremental Model

It is developed to overcome the weaknesses of the waterfall model. It starts with an initial planning and ends with deployment with the cyclic interactions in between. The basic idea behind this method is to develop a system through repeated cycles (iterative) and in smaller portions at a time (incremental), allowing software developers to take advantage of what was learned during the development of earlier parts or versions of the system.

Agile Model

It is based on iterative and incremental development, where requirements and solutions evolve through collaboration between cross-functional teams.

It can be used with any type of the project, but it needs more engagement from the customer and to be interactive. Also, it can be used when the customer needs to have some functional requirement ready in less than three weeks and the requirements are not clear enough.